the children’s (Passover) table

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My children’s table for ages 4-9. I decorate with frogs, but no water in the finger bowls (they would become ponds for said frogs in which to swim). I put inexpensive wine glasses for their grape juice. A Seder can last hours. But not when you have young children.

The Passover Seder is a time of teaching. However, we all know that we should make the Seder something that young children look forward to…no memories of being scolded to sit still & listen over & over & over. It is a commandment to teach our children. We all know children learn better when they are engaged. When my children were young, the Seder plate explanation took about 5 to 10 minutes. I KNEW they would have a life time of the holiday, so I wasn’t going to shove the experience down their throats right from the get-go. As the years have gone by, each Passover has become a bit longer.

When they were little, the “cool” part of the story were the 10 plagues…for children, most giggle at the thought of having frogs everywhere. So I bought rubber & plastic frogs. I put them everywhere during the week. You know why? Because it was (is) FUN. When they were younger, I printed parts of the story from the internet for them to color. They could bring the story to life with art. They could color the parting of the Red Sea. They could color the “eeewww” gross bugs, boils & cattle. And they could color the water red…once a year.

The table is set with respect. The wish to be like a grown up with the fancy wine glasses, but also a table set to keep the children happy & engaged, which means they are learning. Which means I’m teaching. Which means I am following the Commandment.

“Thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children…”

 

10 Comments Add yours

  1. Reggie says:

    This is such a creative approach to teaching tradition… I’m sure they can integrate the teachings and the stories much better like this. You’re an awesome mom. πŸ™‚

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    1. Amy Saab says:

      Thank you so much, Reggie. It helped having worked in a preschool for five years. I learned a lot teaching two year olds. I learned a lot teaching my own. They continue to teach me every year…Lucky me. ~amy

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  2. drough2013 says:

    It seems like the original Passover was experienced with total engagement of every member of the family. Repeating the memory every year is such a key to spiritual heritage and yet not an easy task when attempting to involve smaller children. I love the frog idea!
    β€œImpress them (commandments) on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home…” Dt 6:7a

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    1. Amy Saab says:

      I think adults have to remember what it was like for them to endure the seder when they were young. The only thing that stands out of me what finding the Matzo for money πŸ™‚
      So I thought planting the memories of the story through art would be a far better memory. Thank you for your comment. I’m glad you like the frog idea. Ask any child about frog plague & I promise you’ll get a giggle…~amy

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  3. Kenn Shapiro says:

    Very nicely done, Amy—beautiful!

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    1. Amy Saab says:

      Thank you so much, Kenn. ~amy

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  4. Morgan says:

    A Lovely Table And Post!

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    1. Amy Saab says:

      Thank you so much, Morgan. ~amy

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  5. avian101 says:

    Have a great Pesach Amy! πŸ™‚

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    1. Amy Saab says:

      Thank you so much! ~amy

      Like

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